Category Archives: Job Search

Five Steps To Organize Your Post-Grad Search

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Are you planning to apply for fellowships? Perhaps you’re considering grad school or want to find a job? And if not a job, then perhaps maybe a post-grad program like Teach for America, the Peace Corps or a faith-based service year? Or maybe you’re like me and you’re trying to do everything because you don’t know what will work out.

Whatever path you’re taking, you need a plan. And not just any plan, one that lets you write lots of applications while still meeting all your regular commitments.  Because this process, if you’re being intentional, could take up to 10+ hours a week of your time. The most important thing is getting those applications in, and here’s one way you can make that happen:

  1. Make an “interest list”. Write down all the fellowships, programs and graduate schools you might be interested in applying for. Hold off on adding in job applications – that will come in later. The Fellowships Office has resources to help you find out about opportunities, as well as narrow down your list. If you are researching graduate schools, the Peterson’s website is excellent.
  1. Make a year-long calendar and divide it into four sections – July to September, October to December, January to March, and April to June.
  1. Find out the deadlines and add these to your calendar. Help yourself by adding in reminders several days before a specific deadline.
  1. Now, turn to your job search. If you don’t have specific positions you are planning to apply for yet, don’t worry. For now, find out when the highest volume of job postings are for your desired field. For many people, this will be January to March, but don’t make any assumptions! Start with the broad overview below, then come   to the CCD for drop-in hours, every day from 8:30-5:00pm to get more details. Don’t forget to also utilize Handshake for current job postings, and visit the careers pages of the companies you are most interested in.

    Arts, Media, Communication & Marketing ……………………………February to May
    Banking, Finance, Real Estate & Insurance ……………………………..August to May
    Consulting, Management, Sales & Human Resources ………………….August to May
    Education, Community Organizations & Nonprofits ………………September to May
    Healthcare, Medicine & Medical Research …………………………….October to May
    Public Policy, Politics, Government & Law …………………………September to May
    Sustainability, Renewable Energy, & Food Systems ………………….January to May
    Technology & Software …………………………………………….September to May


  1. Make some decisions. At this point, you may be looking at your calendar thinking, there is no way I have the time to apply for everything here. Good! This calendar is not just about helping you plan, but also helping you prioritize. Look where in your calendar is particularly full. Consider, too, the parts of the year you know you are more busy, ie. exam season. Then make a second list – you can call it “maybe if I’m feeling super human” or something like that – and begin to move some of the items from your calendar onto this list. You can always put them back on your calendar, but no sense getting overwhelmed now.

It’s never too early or late to make a calendar-plan, but the sooner you start thinking about it the more you can spread out your applications. And don’t discount the benefits of applying for early Fellowship deadlines. It may be hard to meet the deadlines, but if you do, not only will you have a couple applications under your belt, you’ll also be ahead of the game on asking for references.

How Ministry Became a Career Option

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Ela Hefler is a senior History Major from Toronto, Canada. This summer she had the opportunity to explore the possibility of a career in Ministry through Davidson’s Ministry Fellowship Program

Before coming to Davidson I had only met one ordained person: the Catholic priest at the church where my family worshiped sporadically. With the exception of the one time I took confession before my first communion we never talked. I couldn’t tell you his name, and by the time I finished primary school my family had almost completely stopped attending mass. I never considered myself Catholic and didn’t give much consideration to whether God existed or not.

church at night At Davidson, that changed, slowly, then seemingly all at once. I got involved in Davidson’s interfaith group, Better Together, as a secular person. Through meals, conversations and celebrations I began to understand the fundamental role faith can play in a person’s identity. I realized that if I really wanted to know my friends and peers, I could no longer dismiss the importance of religion and religious understanding. Interfaith work also prompted me to dig deeper into my own beliefs. When I began to let go of a binary understanding of faith I started to find that a lot of the language and values of Christianity helped me find depth and grounding in my own identity, as well as my responsibilities to other people and relationships.

It’s still hard for me to wrap my head around how, in three years, I went from never having met an ordained woman to considering ministry as a vocation and accepting a nine-week summer “fellowship in religious vocation and leadership.” When I tell people I spent my summer interning at a church, most people ask – very tentatively – whether I want to be a minister. The answer is, I don’t know.

For years, I had planned to go into International Relations or Development. Davidson was the only college I applied to without an IR major, which may be how I ended up falling in love with history and domestic policy. Though my academic interests had changed, my plans for after college had not. That is until I paused to look back on my time at Davidson and realized the two areas I had invested the most time and energy were academic diversity and religious life. I realized my career goals hadn’t kept pace with my growing and changing passions, and that I wanted a career grounded in relationships rather than politics, and focused on domestic issues and communities.

Every summer Davidson College offers five rising seniors the opportunity to explore congregational ministry through the Ministry Fellowship in Religious Vocation and Leadership. The fellowship begins with an eight to ten week summer internship with an experience clergy member, and the fellows continue to meet regularly to discuss vocational discernment throughout their senior years. Students of all religious backgrounds are invited to apply.

However challenging I found the idea of ordination I knew a summer exploring ministry would give me the chance to explore in the ways I wanted to. And it did. I spent nine weeks at First Congregational Church of Minnesota, a United Church of Christ congregation in Minneapolis. It was a phenomenal experience, and I still don’t know if I want to go into ministry.

a sign in front of a church that reads "to our Muslim neighbours a blessed ramadan"But, here’s what I do know – ministry is hard, and hard to define. Over the course of nine weeks I led prayers, gave communion, wrote and delivered a sermon, planned a vespers service, helped with home visits and attended a weekly bible study with local ministers of a different denomination. I also volunteered at a food pantry and an interfaith garden, created and ran a church Instagram account, protested the police killings of Philando Castile and Anton Sterling, helped organize a vigil for the victims of the Orlando massacre and ordered lawn signs for the church and our members, which read “To our Muslim neighbors a blessed Ramadan”.

I know that I am a better listener after this summer. I have learned to recognize the value of simply being a “non-anxious presence” when there are no answers and you’ve said all you can. I have begun to let go of the fear that I am not “Christian enough” to go into ministry or contribute to a conversation about bible texts. I’ve started to think about how church can be verb, or a conceptual noun, and not just a fixed location with a steeple.

I’m grateful to Davidson College, and the Chaplain’s Office in particular, for walking with me as I stepped beyond my comfort zone to explore a career and a field I had never thought to imagine myself in.

Why Use DCAN?

–Original blog contribution by: Beza Baheru (’16)

picture of DCAN

Davidson Career Advisor Network (DCAN) is one of the key resources for students to utilize in their journey to find a career they are interested in. It connects students with either alumni or parents who are willing to share their knowledge and previous experiences concerning their career and industry through a conference call or online. It is a great opportunity to network and receive career advice. The categories for consultations are career conversations, resume critique and mock interviews.

How do you navigate and access DCAN?

The first step is to register for an account through the register link. Post registration, you can login using your Davison e-mail user name and you don’t need to enter a password. On your DCAN page, you can filter through advisors by function, industry, employers, services, location, and languages.

What is the next step after you have identified advisors?

Every advisee has 10 credits which can be used to set up a consultation in the three categories above. Each consultation is one credit. For career conversations and resume critiques, the duration of the meeting is 30 minutes whereas it is an hour for mock interviews. In order to schedule a specific time that works for both the advisee and the advisor, the advisee will propose three separate times –  make sure the time is correctly added! For instance, I scheduled a career consultation with an advisor for 5:00 AM thinking that I set it up for 5:00 PM. On the day of the consultation, I received an e-mail notifying me that I have missed my appointment in the morning. My initial confusion while I opened the e-mail gradually turned into anger when I realized my mistake since I was looking forward to this the whole week. Fortunately, I apologized and was able to set-up another meeting but this goes to show you the importance of identifying the right time as to not waste a perfect career development opportunity.

What to do during the consultation?

It is vital that you are prepared for each consultation. For the career conversation, you will probably want to bring a couple of questions and perhaps research ahead of time the advisor’s job or industry to have a grasp of what their work entails. Similarly, wearing business formal attire and bringing your resume for the mock interview is a critical part of the interview experience. For the resume critique, you definitely want to bring your resume since that is what you will be modifying.

How to approach post-consultation?

Towards the end of the conversation or interview, you should ask the advisor for contact information, preferably their e-mail. Why you ask? A thank you note is always essential to demonstrate the advisor that it was an enriching practice in your career exploration. This also taps into establishing your networking skills so that if you have more questions in the future, you can reach out to the advisors.

 

5 Quick Tips on “First Time” Networking from a Davidson Senior

–Original blog Contribution by: Mahlek Pothemont (’16)

Networking can definitely seem like a hassle for any student. However, establishing and expanding your networks is arguably the most important tool you have here at Davidson. Here are 5 quick tips to help you best utilize your networking abilities!

 Be Proactive

Being at the right place at the right time takes planning. Before attending any public forum, think about who could possibly be there and what tools you will need to make good impression. Practice your elevator speech that gives people a basic rundown of your academic status and your professional interests. Also, consider printing out business cards that display similar background information.

Be Present

The only way you can take advantage of networking opportunities is to go and seek them out! Networking events and programs happen everywhere you go. In fact, I consider it to be something that happens 24/7 at Davidson. Every person at the college (student, staff, etc.) has the potential to be added to your network, so don’t be afraid to get out of your comfort zone.

Be Engaging

Networking is definitely a two way street. When you want access to a network be ready to open up yours to others as well. This requires a certain amount of engagement during the first conversation. A good way to do this is to get an individual talking about their own experiences. Often, just asking for advice can establish a positive dynamic and bring some clarity to the potential career path you’re interested in.

Be Aggressive

Contrary to popular belief, it pays off to be forthright in your networking tactics. The people you meet are not going to have enough time to talk to everyone that wants to talk to them. This is where your business cards come in handy!  You should take advantage of every opportunity to place yourself in networks, even if only to request a later conversation. Business card etiquette typically means that if you give a card, you get a card in return, so you will have access to followup with that person shortly after meeting.  Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there!

Be Prompt

When networking, timing is everything. When you’re scheduled for a lunch or networking call, try your best to be at least 10 minutes early to the meet-up location. When following up on a networking connection, give yourself a 24-hour time limit for response when corresponding via email. Being prompt in your communication can be the difference between a valuable connection and a damaged one.

Huron Consulting Group: A New (to Davidson) Name in Consulting

huron logo

Huron Consulting Group stands out as one of the fastest growing financial and operational consulting firms in the industry, serving clients in the healthcare, education, legal, life sciences, and business advisory sectors. The Davidson-Huron relationship began with the Healthcare practice in 2014-15 when we shared their summer internship opportunity. After a successful first run with Haley Rhodes ’16 during the summer of 2015, Huron Healthcare is back! This time, the practice is recruiting for their full-time Consulting Analyst positions.

In an effort to help Davison students get better acquainted with the practice, we connected with current recruiting coordinator, Megan Krizmanich. Megan began her career with Huron after graduating from The University of Notre Dame and served three years as a consultant before transitioning to her current role. Students will have the opportunity to meet Megan on-campus Monday, September 21 for an information session at 7:30pm in Alvarez 209. She will also be conducting one-on-one informational interviews on Tuesday, September 22 – limited space is available for these interviews.  The deadline for the full-time Huron Healthcare Consulting Analyst position is September 30.

We also reached out to Haley Rhodes ’16 to learn about her experience with the summer internship program. Haley, a graduating senior double majoring in Public Health and Hispanic Studies, spent some time speaking with CCD Employer Relations Ambassador, Chelsea Alexander ’18.

Read on for portions of our Q&As with Megan and Haley to learn more about Huron Consulting Group. We hope to see you in-person Monday at 7:30pm in Alvarez 209.

 

CCD: What drew you personally to the Healthcare Consulting role when you started at Huron? 

Megan Krizmanich: I started my undergraduate studies confident I was going to medical school, but I quickly changed my mind after standing in on my first surgery… I was still very passionate about the healthcare industry, but wanted to focus more on the business side.  Huron Healthcare fit the mold and after I met with people at the firm, I was sold!

 

CCD: How would you describe Huron’s work environment to someone who doesn’t know?

Haley Rhodes: A lot like Davidson culture. Collaborative. Immediately the team wanted me to succeed. They gave me a lot of responsibility from the first day and allowed me to do hospital unit observations on my own in the hospital once they knew I was comfortable. It gave me a lot of confidence. My teammates would say, “Come sit next to me, I’ll teach you how to do this analysis in Excel and whenever you have a question just ask.” I also had a development meeting every week with my supervisor where she would ask what I wanted to learn and what things I had done that I really enjoyed.

 

CCD: What did an average workday look like for you in the internship?

Haley: Monday and Thursday were travel days. I would wake up and go to the airport—a lot of the team traveling from Chicago would go on a plane together, then work out of the team room in our hotel. Then, we would do observations in the hospital and go on rounds or be in the team room doing projects, doing analyses or talking with our client counterparts. Other days, we would work at the hospital—leave from the hotel, go to the hospital, and work in the corporate room of the hospital and talk and lead trainings or conduct observations.

 

CCD: What is a common mistake you see candidates make during the application process?

Megan: Candidates tend to get caught up in selling themselves and can come across insincere.  Recognize that recruiting is a two way street; it is a chance for employers to learn more about your background, but at the same time it is a chance for you to learn more about companies and determine if it is a fit for you too.

 

CCD: Aside from academic experience, is there anything you particularly look for on a resume?  

Megan: Extracurricular; being involved at school, in your community, during the summer, etc.  A big challenge in consulting is time management.  If you are involved in extracurricular and successful in school, it clearly demonstrates that you already possess time management skills.

 

CCD: What advice would you give other Davidson students interested in applying to Huron?

Haley: I recommend reaching out to people at the firm to understand what it is like to be a consultant because the lifestyle is one to consider. I would also suggest practicing and honing organizational and quantitative skills, being comfortable with numbers and analysis, and taking initiative because I think doing that helped me to stand out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Value of Information Sessions

Genevieve Becker '15, Gender Studies & Hispanic Studies
Genevieve Becker ’15, Gender Studies & Hispanic Studies

This post was contributed by Genevieve Becker ’15. Genevieve is beginning her final semester as a Senior double major in Gender Studies and Hispanic Studies. While she will never forget her first job at a hot dog stand, her collegiate career experience includes interning for several Charlotte-area magazine publications, interning for former U.S. Senator Kay R. Hagan in Washington, DC, and interning at a market-research firm in Washington, DC. On campus, she has been involved in Student Government, Davidson College Chorale, Students Consulting for Non-Profit Organizations, the tour guide program, and the Office of Alumni Relations. When she graduates, she plans to begin a career in consulting or market research. She can be reached at gebecker@davidson.edu.

 

Welcome and welcome back, Wildcats! I hope everyone’s summer didn’t fly by as quickly as mine did. As I enter my senior year, I hope I have a few bits of wisdom to impart regarding internship and career searching. For the incoming freshmen reading this, first of all, kudos to you for looking ahead to your professional career, and for my fellow seniors, deep breaths, the job search can’t be that bad…right(?)

The Center for Career Development asked me to share some thoughts about the information sessions hosted by the office. If you’re new to the term, an information session is usually a one-ish hour presentation by an employer or organization right here on campus. They are usually held in advance of job or internship deadlines. You can view the calendar for information sessions on WildcatLink.

What are the benefits of attending information sessions?

Like many, I was skeptical at first of the true benefit of attending an information session on a position that I thought I already knew everything about. Even if you think you already know every objective detail about a company or a position, you WILL learn something new. Maybe you will learn something about the company structure that you can work into the classic interview question, “And why do you want to work for Company X?”

Information sessions are also useful for gleaning subjective information on a company. Talking to employees and session hosts before or after the event often proves most valuable for me. If you’re not the best “mingler,” try arriving to the information session a little bit early and introducing yourself then, instead of waiting until after the formal presentation. Asking employees questions about their personal experience or for advice is mutually beneficial. That is, you will learn something about the company and an employee will put a face to a name, or perhaps, even learn something about you. These conversations often prompt employees to share professional anecdotes, which personally, reminds me that my prospective employers are human, too. This takes some edge off when hitting “submit” on an application or in the preparation stages for an interview.

What could the value be for younger students that are not necessarily ready to start applying for internships/jobs?

First and foremost, I recommend that younger students approach these information sessions because you’re excited about your career (yes, really) and not out of obligation. I saw searching for an internship as a necessary evil the Spring of my sophomore year. The previous summer I had studied abroad with Davidson in Cadiz and lamented how the rest of my summers would be dedicated to my career. I wish I hadn’t approached my professional life so begrudgingly at first. Now, in the thick of networking and information session season, I am excited and energized by a career. It can be fun to attend an information session and imagine your life at Company X or Company Y. It can be fun to tell a potential employer about your accomplishments. If I had known this earlier, I think I would have taken more advantage of the Career Development hosted events as a younger student.


 

Red Ventures Photo 2

 

“Even if you think you already know every objective detail about a company or a position, you WILL learn something new.”

 


How do you prepare for attending an information session?

Read up on the company before you go. I don’t mean on your way there on your phone while you’re hurrying over from a Commons dinner. Take half an hour to use the Google (not kidding) and read about the company. Obviously it’s okay if you don’t know everything there is to know about the company prior to going, but knowing that Company X is an investment banking firm and not a television production company is generally good before attending. Also, prepare some questions and make sure they’re questions that cannot be answered during your thirty minutes of Googling. I recommend asking personal experience questions, as those usually produce the most unique (and memorable) responses. Finally, if you’re feeling really ambitious or you’re particularly interested in a certain company, take the time to research and reach out to alumni who work or have worked at the company. Showing the company that you’ve invested in them is strong motivation for them to invest in you.

Oh, and one last thing– check the dress code for the information session before you show up in jeans. Not to beat a dead horse, but it’s always safer to overdress. Your outfit should be put together and tasteful, but also individualized. For me, this is a statement necklace, but for one of my fellow seniors, it’s his signature Texas cowboy boots (you know who you are if you’ve read this far).

How do you follow-up?

Before you leave the session, make sure that you get the contact information for the people that you spoke to. Asking for a card or an email address is not as awkward as you think it is, and well worth your time. One to two days after the event, shoot your contact an email thanking them for taking the time to answer your questions. A small email can go a long way. For those who are so inclined, writing a handwritten thank you note is an extra special way to be remembered. While it may take a little longer, I think this 48 cent investment is quite impressionable well worth your time if you’re really interested in a career with said company.

Get to Know the Center for Career Development

2015 Center for Career Development Staff
2015 Center for Career Development Staff

Welcome back!  While we enjoyed a little break this summer, we are excited that campus is back to normal.  We took advantage of the quiet to do a little restructuring, plan some programming, connect with new employers, and just a few other things.  So, meet our staff and some of the great resources in the Center for Career Development!

Nathan Elton, Director
Nathan Elton, Director

Nathan’s Favorite CCD Resource: Davidson Career Advisor Network (DCAN) Some of the most common career advice you will hear is to talk to professionals in potential or identified career areas of interest.  Through DCAN there are over 800 Davidson alumni and parents who have signed up to share career advice, look over your resume, or prepare you for an upcoming interview.  Jobs and internships can be tough to land, but by using these connections you will know more about career fields that match your interests and abilities, and be better prepared for securing a position.

Jamie Johnson, Associate Director for Career Development
Jamie Johnson, Associate Director for Career Development

Jamie’s Favorite CCD Resource: Myers Briggs Type Indicator All of us have uniquely different personalities. The MBTI assessment will help give you a better understanding of your own personality, such as what energizes you or how you make career decisions. The assessment will also assist you in better understanding the people around you, whether they be at school, work or home. To take the MBTI, please contact our office at 704-894-2132 to set up an appointment to meet with a Career advisor.

 

Jeff Kniple, Associate Director for Employer Relations
Jeff Kniple, Associate Director for Employer Relations

Jeff’s Favorite CCD Resource: Information sessions are the place to make a personal connection with employers in advance of an application or interview.  They are the easiest place to make an impression with key staff members, to learn about how companies market themselves, and to learn other information that can be helpful in a cover letter or interview.  For internship and job seekers they are essential to the process.

 

 

Tiffany Waddell, Assistant Director for Career Development

Tiffany’s Favorite CCD Resource: Workshops and Programs The CCD offers workshops and events on a variety of topics for students throughout the academic year.  From getting started with LinkedIn and learning how network with Davidson alumni and other professionals, to penning the perfect resume – check out WildcatLink to learn more about what workshops are available to you this year and RSVP today!

 

 

Sarah Williams '11, Assistant Director for Alumni & Parent Engagement
Sarah Williams ’11, Assistant Director for Alumni & Parent Engagement

Sarah’s Favorite CCD Resource: WildcatLink is the best resource for accessing Davidson-specific career opportunities and resources. It is an online portal where you can apply to jobs and internships, sign up for job shadowing opportunities, and register for career-related events and programs. If you haven’t already, you will soon become very familiar with WildcatLink!

 

 

 

Jamie Stamey, Assistant Director for Internships
Jamie Stamey, Assistant Director for Internships

Jamie’s Favorite CCD Resource: InterviewStream is a great tool to help you prepare for upcoming interviews.  Record a video of yourself answering industry specific questions.  Then, critique yourself or share with a mentor to get their feedback.  You know what they say about practice!  You might also see this pop up in some of you Davidson-sponsored program applications, like Job Shadowing and the #DavidsonIE Internship Program.

 

Kate Falconi '08, Assistant Director for Employer Relations
Kate Falconi ’08, Assistant Director for Employer Relations

Kate’s Favorite CCD Resource: Vault Think of this as a huge online library of career and industry guides to help you learn about jobs and career fields, and make sure you are ready for interviews.  It also includes rankings of employers in 20 different industries, such as advertising, PR, media, banking and consulting.

 

 

 

Julie Lucas, Office Manager
Julie Lucas, Office Manager

Julie’s Favorite CCD Resource: It’s easy to schedule an appointment to meet with one of our advisors.  Stop by the office or call 704-894-2132. Appointments are available from 9-12:00 and 1:30-5:00.  For quick questions, we also offer daily walk-in times M-TH 10:00-12:00 and M-F 1:30-3:30.

 

 

 

Logan Myers, Career Adviser
Logan Myers, Career Advisor

Logan’s Favorite CCD Resource: Davidson’s LinkedIn Landing Page and LinkedIn Networking Group Want to learn what 11,000 alumni are doing based on their major, where they live, what they do and where they work?  Davidson’s LinkedIn Landing page is an easily searchable system to learn about alumni based on these and other criteria.  Want to interact with alumni in LinkedIn?  Check out the Davidson College Network Group, where you can send messages to over 6,000 alumni.

 

Why Choose Consulting?

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Consulting is one of the most popular destinations for recent Davidson graduates.  If that is surprising for a liberal arts college, perhaps it shouldn’t be.  Companies look for characteristics that Davidson students are known for – agile thinkers who can use qualitative and quantitative information to solve complex problems.

Not all Davidson students who join the field made early plans to do so.  If fact, many of the current alumni discovered consulting by being talked into going to one of the information sessions.  Come and discover for yourself what the field entails and why so many Davidson graduates make it their first stop for an internship or after graduation.

Here are the upcoming information sessions and application deadlines for summer internships:

  • Bain & Company – January 13 session @ 7:30pm in Hance Auditorium, (Application Deadline: January 23)
  • Deloitte – January 15 session @ 7:30pm in Alvarez 408, (Application Deadline: January 18)
  • McKinsey – Application Deadline: January 18
  • Oliver Wyman – Application Deadline: January 19
  • Red Ventures –January 29 session @ 7:30pm in TBD

Here are some thoughts from Davidson alumni who pursued careers in consulting upon graduation:

“As a religion major, I didn’t have a particularly strong business background, but heard consulting provided an opportunity to quickly learn business skills and fundamentals across numerous industries so I decided to take a closer look. I found that consulting basically consists of helping companies think through their hardest questions and problems, which is not that different than the critical thinking and structuring of arguments I did at Davidson.”  – Boyce Whitesides ’11, Bain & Company

“Originally thinking I wanted to head to med school, consulting was never on my radar until I realized I liked the problem solving aspect of medicine more than the actual medicine part! After talking to a few people about alternative careers, consulting kept coming up. To me it is truly the liberal arts of the career world – I can continue to explore my multiple interests, while constantly challenging myself and pushing me to think outside of the box.”Tasha Samborski ’14, Deloitte

“Consulting provides an excellent first job for high performing students that are still uncertain about where they’d like to take their careers.  Recent graduates working at consulting firms quickly learn a wide variety of professional skills from experienced colleagues, are exposed to a broad range of roles and industries, and find themselves with excellent exit opportunities if the right moment comes along.”Mark Nesbitt ’13, Oliver Wyman

“Like many Davidson students, I considered banking following graduation, but after learning more about consulting, I found that the diverse experiences, focus on training, and career development that it offered were more appealing. In many ways, consulting has been a natural extension of the liberal arts learning experience that I enjoyed at Davidson, allowing me to explore a wide range of industries, companies, and disciplines.”Kyle Kinsell ’07, Bain & Company