Category Archives: Healthcare, Medicine & Medical Research

Taking a Gap Year Before Med School & Information on Fellowships

Taking a Gap Year Before Med School
Thursday, February 21st
 – 7:00pm, 900 Room
Meet alumni to learn about their gap year experiences before med school and learn about fellowships available before and after graduation.

Davidson Alumni: 

Devin Haddad ’10, Caroline Ludwig ’12, Malcolm Moses-Hampton ’12

Fellowships and Scholarships: 
Dr. Ted Ogaldez, Director of Graduate Fellowships at Davidson College, and Dr. Scott Denham, Chair of the Graduate Fellowships Committee.

Alumni Bios: |
Devin Haddad ’10 – A Center major at Davidson, Mr. Haddad moved to Washington, DC after graduation to work for an immunology lab at the FDA for two years. He is now a medical student at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

Caroline Ludwig ’12 – A biology major and French minor, Ms. Ludwig is currently working at LifeStar Emergency Medical Services in Winston-Salem, NC, and volunteers at the Brenner Children’s Hospital.  She also teaches a dance exercise class at the local YMCA.  Ms. Ludwig plans to attend medical school next year.

Malcolm Moses-Hampton ‘12 – Mr. Moses-Hampton is currently a NSF Lab & Research Technician in Dr. Julio Ramirez’s Neuroscience Lab in the Davidson College Psychology Department.  As such, he manages and conducts grant projects with Dr. Ramirez. Mr. Moses-Hampton plans to attend medical school in 2014, eventually practicing as a neurosurgeon with specific application to traumatic brain injuries.

 

Pre-Med Major Carter Devlin ’13 Gives Business a Try

By Brennan McCormick, Career Services Ambassador

As a pre-med chemistry major, Carter Devlin ’13 has always had an interest in medicine. This past summer, however, he was given an opportunity to explore the business side of the healthcare industry. As a Business Development and Planning intern at Biologics, Inc. Carter was tasked with performing market research and competitor analysis for one of the most specialized drug distribution companies in the world. Carter’s summer culminated in a presentation delivered to the executive team and strategic planning committee meant to showcase his findings over the course of this summer.


“Carter’s experience serves as a reminder that one need not be a doctor to get involved in the healthcare industry.”

For those interested in medicine, but wary of medical school, a position like Carter’s is a great way to break into the healthcare industry.

Carter’s position placed a heavy emphasis on writing, research, and communication skills, all of which are developed by the Davidson curriculum. Carter reported that a position like this is also a valuable learning experience for anyone interested in medicine. By gaining exposure to various drug distribution channels and the clinical trial process, a position in the business side of the healthcare industry arms a Davidson student with the tools to continue in the healthcare industry or break off into a related field such as marketing or consulting.  Carter’s experience serves as a reminder that one need not be a doctor to get involved in the healthcare industry.

Research & Internship Opportunities in the Sciences

Includes: Neuropsychology, Psychology, Environmental Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Medicine, Public Health, Biochemistry, Engineering, and Computer Science

Undergraduate research opportunities offer you the chance to participate in exciting projects, working beside some of the most talented scientists in the field.  They also help you gain needed experience to get in to graduate school or to obtain the position you’re applying for after graduation.

Below are links to a wide range of scientific research opportunities. Some offer stipends, while others are unpaid.  Deadlines vary, but in general, the earlier you apply the better. You should also check with your professors when seeking research opportunities as many have openings available for Davidson students that are not advertised. Davidson professors will also know of colleagues looking for people to work in their labs.

Research Experiences for Undergraduates
This is the premier site for summer research positions in the sciences. REU sites are competitively selected by the National Science Foundation (NSF), so the positions tend to be of very high quality (and tend to pay well, also).

Grants and Research Opportunities on the Davidson College Biology site
List of opportunities listed on the Davidson College Biology Department website.  This is for all sciences, public health, etc.

American Psychological Association
Undergraduate research opportunities and internships in Neuroscience and Psychology.

RIT Co-op and Scientific Internship Listings
This list provides a wide range of short and long-term cooperative and internship listings in science and technology.

List of summer research/internship opportunities in the sciences
Provided by Grinnell College, but not affiliated with the college – open to students across the country, and in a variety of disciplines:  biologybiochemistrychemistrycomputer scienceengineeringenvironmental sciencemathematics,medicinephysics,

Biotech and Pharmaceutical
Bio
Biotechnology Industry Organization is a professional association designed to provide information and support for those in the biotechnology field.  Their website provides excellent information on specific fields, current research and career opportunities.

BioSpace
News and job opportunities for those interested in the biotech and pharmaceutical fields.

PhRMA
PhRMA’s mission is to conduct effective advocacy for public policies that encourage
discovery of important new medicines for patients by biopharmaceutical research companies. This webside provides a variety of resources on the field.

Environmental Studies
Environmental Studies: Greater Research Opportunities Undergraduate Fellowships
For undergraduate students in environmentally fields of  studies.

Environmental Science Institute
Funded by the National Science Foundation, this program is open to a national pool of undergraduate applicants and requires a ten-week commitment. Students create their own research project, participate in a research group, and present their work.

Math
Mathematical Association of America
The MAA provides mathematicians with the best expository articles, engaging problems, and articles devoted to teaching collegiate mathematics. The MAA also provides research funding opportunities.

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
International community of over 13,000 individual members. Almost 500 academic, manufacturing, research and development, service and consulting organizations, government, and military organizations worldwide are institutional members. The website has an excellent career-related section that lists internships and jobs within the field and provides career information and advice.

Physics
National Science Foundation
List of physics REU sites, both theoretical and experimental.

Public Health Opportunities
Johns Hopkins  – Funding/Internships Announcements
Compiled listing of public health related internships and research opportunities. Students do not need to be attending Johns Hopkins to apply.

Science
The National Academies
The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute ofMedicine, and National Research Council are private, nonprofit institutions that provide expert advice on some of the most pressing challenges facing the nation and the world.

Science.gov: USA.gov for Science
Internships and fellowship opportunities in science.

Scientific-related opportunities compiled by Columbia University, Department ofBiological Studies
Biology, Biomedical, Minority, Ecology and Environmental Studies, Marine Biology Research Opportunities, Fellowships, Internships and Summer Courses. Programs are located in all geographic areas of the country.

Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Boston University
Ten-week undergraduate program for students interested in pursuing a career as a research scientist. Students are chosen from a national pool.

Allied Health Field: Over 200 Careers to Choose From

The term Allied Health describes a group of health professions made up of as many as 200 health careers. There are 5 million allied health care providers in the U.S., who work in more than 80 different professions and represent approximately 60% of all health care provider.  This is just a drop in the bucket in terms of how many allied health care workers are needed to meet current and future healthcare needs in America.

When you work in allied health, you are involved (directly or indirectly) with patient health, and you are regarded as an expert in your field. Some allied health professionals practice independently; others work as part of a health care team, providing continual evaluation and assessment of patient needs. They also play a major role in informing the attending clinician of the patient’s progress and response to treatment.

The allied health professions fall into two broad categories: technicians (assistants) and therapists/technologists. Technicians are trained to perform procedures, and their education lasts less than two years. They are required to work under the supervision of technologists or therapists. This part of the allied health field includes physical therapy assistants, medical laboratory technicians, radiological technicians, occupational therapy assistants, recreation therapy assistants, and respiratory therapy technicians.

The educational process for therapists or technologists is more intensive and includes acquiring procedural skills. In addition, students of therapy/technology learn to evaluate patients, diagnose conditions, develop treatment plans, and understand the rationale behind various treatments in order to judge their appropriateness and potential side effects. Educational curricula teach students to evaluate patients’ responses to therapy and make appropriate decisions about continued treatment or modification of treatment plans.

For more information about Allied Health, see the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions Website. The U.S. Department of Labor has a whole section on allied health professions on its Career Voyages Website.  The Health Professions Network (HPN) publishes a feature on the “Allied Health Profession of the Month. Another online newsletter called  MinorityNurse.com includes “A Day in the Life” of professionals in various allied health careers.

To find an accredited allied health program, see the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Programs Website— which lists most, but not all, of the allied health fields. Some allied health programs are credentialed by another accrediting body. The American Association of Community Colleges also provides a list of schools that train students for allied health careers.

Additional Resources:
Check out the Health Professions Network (HPN) Facebook pageFacebook to stay up-to-date on trends in health care careers.

KevinMD.com offers good articles and commentary on healthcare, and is one of the top social media websites.

Source: Allied Health Group

Curriculum Vita or Resume? What’s the Difference?

The basic differences between a résumé and a curriculum vitae (CV) are the length, what is included in each document, and what each document is used for. A résumé is a one or two page summary of your skills, experience and education. It is brief and concise, usually no more than a page or two.  (The preference is to keep it to one page.)  In contrast, a CV is a longer (at least two pages) and more detailed synopsis.

There are different ways of talking about these documents. The word résumé, which is French for “summary,” is the overall standard in the United States. However, the word vita goes by several variations. A vita, which is Latin for “life,” is sometimes called a CV. CV is short for the Latin phrase curriculum vitae, which can be loosely translated into English as “course of life.” So, CV, curriculum vitae, and vita all refer to the same document.

The CV
A CV is an in-depth document that can be laid out over two or more pages. It contains a high level of detail about your achievements, a great deal more than just a career biography. The CV covers your education as well as any other accomplishments, such as publications, awards, honors etc.

CVs tend to be organized chronologically and should be easy to get an overview of an individual’s full working career. A CV is static and doesn’t change for different positions.  The difference would be in the cover letter.

The Résumé
A résumé, is a concise document typically no longer than one page. The employer/reader will not dwell on this document for very long. The goal of a résumé is to make an individual stand out from the competition.

The job seeker should adapt the résumé to every position they apply for.  It is in the applicant’s interest to change the résumé from one job application to another and to target it to the needs of the specific position. A résumé is a highly customizable document.

Differences
The three major differences between CVs and résumés are the length, the purpose and the layout. A résumé is a brief summary of your skills and experience over one or two pages, a CV is more detailed and can stretch well beyond two pages. The résumé will be tailored to each position, while the CV will stay the same and any changes will be in the cover letter.

A CV has a clear chronological order listing the whole career of the individual, while a résumé’s information can be shuffled around to best suit the applicant. The main difference between a résumé and a CV is that a CV is intended to be a full record of your career history.  A résumé is a brief, targeted list of skills and achievements.

Usage around the world
A résumé is the preferred application document in the USA and Canada. Americans and Canadians would only use a CV when applying for a job abroad or if searching for an academic or research oriented position.

In the UK, Ireland and New Zealand, a CV is used in all work environments.  Résumés are not used at all. The CV prevails in mainland Europe and there is even a European Union CV format available for download.

In Germany, the CV is more commonly known as a Lebenslauf. Applying for a job requires more documentation than in other countries. German employers want a lot of information about a candidate even before they make their first decisions on who to accept for an interview, so you must send them a packet with a cover letter, a “Lebenslauf” (CV), a passport photograph, school certificates, and testimonials of previous employment.

In Australia, India and South Africa, the terms résumé and CV are used interchangeably. The term résumé is used more for jobs in the private sector and a CV is more commonplace when applying for public service positions.

Questions regarding your résumé or CV can be addressed by your career advisor in the Career Services office during Walk-In hours (M-F, 1:30-3:30pm), or by appointment. In addition, Career Services has information, and sample resumes and CVs  specifically for Davidson students on their website to use as guides.

 

Pre-Med and Life Sciences Internships for Summer 2012

Internships and Summer Research Opportunities in the Life Sciences for 2012 are provided here.  Search for opportunities that meet any of the following criteria:

  1. Biomedical research
  2. Located in a medical or clinical setting
  3. Located in a medical school or health science center
  4. Has “biomedical” as a descriptor
  5. May be of particular interest to pre-med students

In addition to the valuable experience and good pay that an internship will give you, very many of the opportunities listed on this website (see below) also provide travel reimbursement, housing and meals. Don’t let concerns about living expenses or the location of an organization posted on this website prevent you from checking out an exciting and challenging  Internship position! If travel support, housing and meals are provided, this information will almost always be included in the details about the Internship that can be found by clicking on the internship website next to the organization’s name and location.

Pre-Med Internships for Summer 2012

Becoming a Physician Assistant

The physician assistant profession is a career which can be lucrative in a short period of time. It is a relatively new field, having only been around since the late 1960s after the Vietnam War ended. Experienced naval officers coming home needed jobs. However, with no equivalent professions related to what the officers had done during the war, the physician assistant profession was born.

When researching physician assistant school prerequisites, you will discover that it is no longer necessary to have miltary experience.  However, it is still required to have medical experience prior to entry into the physician assistant program at most schools.

Work Requirements 
Most physician assistant programs prefer that applicants have two years of relevant medical experience before applying. Work as a paramedic, a nurse, a respiratory therapist, or a medical assistant are examples of relevant work history experiences.

Volunteering, office work, medical billing and coding are not considered relevant medical experiences. Hands-on experience with patients is the key requirement for qualification.

Educational Requirements
Being in solid academic standing is also a requirement when applying for PA programs. You need to have taken and completed certain prerequisite classes. Most programs require general courses in English, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, and microbiology. The majority of the physician assistant programs will also require a bachelors degree. (Some programs will not require this as a prerequisite, but this is changing so that eventually all programs will require the undergraduate degree.)

Application Process
The application process is competitive, as there are many applicants applying each year for a small number of openings. Make sure that your application is strong overall, and that you also have a strong, well-written personal statement as well.

Interview Process
The interview process is intense, and will require careful preparation. Practice ahead of time carefully and dress appropriately.  You may be asked personal questions regarding your character during the interview. (Are you the type of person that the interviewer would trust with the care of a member of their family?)

Difference Between a Nurse Practitioner and a Physician’s Assistant
There is a difference between a Nurse Practitioner and a Physician Assistant.  A Physician Assistant must be supervised by a physician, while a Nurse Practitioner may have their own practice.  For more details, go to Laying the Foundation for Physician Assistant Degree Programs.

Summer Health-Related Internships and Opportunities for 2012

There are many summer internship opportunities in health related fields. Most programs have application deadlines in January, February and March.

Opportunities are available in the following areas:
Research | Clinical | Public Health | Dental Medicine | Veterinary | International Opportunities | For Disadvantaged/Underrepresented Minority Students

These links are provided for your convenience and do not represent an endorsement by the Davidson College Office of Career Services, or Swarthmore College.  Click on the link of the areas you are interested in to find out about details, deadlines and requirements.  Start now to look for summer internships as positions will be competitive.

University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine Offers Unique VMD-PhD Degree

SARS – AIDS – Ebola – Avian Influenza –Anthrax –  Botulism – Plague – West Nile Virus –
Mad Cow Disease  – Smallpox

Over 60% of all infectious diseases of animals can also affect humans. Incidences of new, emerging zoonotic infectious diseases are also on the rise.

Veterinarian-scientists, by virtue of their broad experience in multiple species and extensive training in both molecular and whole animal contexts, are uniquely qualified to address the complex problems presented in modern biomedical research. Earning a combined VMD-PhD degree at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine can prepare you for addressing these issues.

As part of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn Vet is a veterinary college and a partner in one of the world’s great biomedical research centers. The interrelationship between animal health and human health –Many Species, One Medicine™ – is at the heart of the school’s research tradition. Knowledge gained from studying animals is vital for understanding human disease. Biomedical research is entering an era that requires the application of molecular knowledge to whole animal physiology.

Students in the program receive full funding support, including Veterinary School and Graduate School tuition and a graduate-level stipend with student health insurance. Funding is also available in scholarship form through the Pfizer Animal Health Diversity Initiative.

Past graduates of the program have entered areas such as:

  • Academics (Faculty)
  • Biotechnology or the Pharmaceutical Industry
  • Government Health and Science Agencies
  • Public Health and Emerging Diseases
  • Regulatory Medicine
  • Contract Research
  • Military Service
  • Clinical Research and Clinical Practice

For more information on the program, go to www.PennVetPhD.org

Information to Improve Public Health

The Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce helps the public health workforce find and use information effectively to improve and protect the public’s health. It is a collaboration of U.S. government agencies, public health organizations, and health sciences libraries which provide timely, convenient access to selected public health resources on the Internet.

This website also provides links to information in the following main categories. Click on those sites of interest to you to locate organizations and resources of interest.