All posts by Sarah Layne

Class of 2017 Spotlights

As we celebrate the success of the class of 2017, let’s take a look at where some of our newest Wildcat alums are headed! Julia Sacha ’17 and Obai Kamara ’17 share with us their upcoming career plans and ways they leveraged the Center during their years at Davidson.

 

Julia Sacha ’17

We’re so excited for you – tell us about where you’re headed next #AfterDavidson!

I will be working as a clinical research coordinator for the Mountain Diabetes and Endocrine Center in Asheville, NC. 

What resources from the Center for Career Development proved most valuable to your professional development as a student?

The Career Center helped me ensure that my cover letters and resumes communicated everything I wanted them to. They were also very encouraging during the application process. Rebecca [Glavin] knew my interests and even started forwarding me job applications on Handshake. 

What is the most surprising interview question you’ve been asked?

I was once asked what the organization’s staff should dress up as next Halloween.

What one key piece of advice would you offer to rising Seniors?

Celebrate small victories. If you don’t get a job you were hoping for, you’ve still learned something about yourself in the process and increased your ability and comfort with communicating who you are and what you care about.

Obai Kamara ’17

We’re so excited for you – tell us about where you’re headed next #AfterDavidson!

I’m happy to say that I have found a job close to home, working as a cost and schedule analyst for Augur Consulting firm in Crystal City, Va.

What resources from the Center for Career Development proved most valuable to your professional development as a student?

As a college student at Davidson, we are involved in a lot of things, and I think the Center for Career Development does a good job of focusing our many talents and accomplishments in a way that makes us the most marketable to employers. I’d say the walk-in meetings were the most valuable for me because I was able to get a lot done in a short amount of time.

What is the most surprising interview question you’ve been asked?

Someone asked my where I was from, which was surprising because it’s one of the first things on my resume!

What one key piece of advice would you offer to rising Seniors?

Get to the Center early and often. The more you practice interviewing, the easier it becomes to vocalize everything you have been working on for the past three years. The staff is very friendly and they want to see you succeed, so they will do everything in their power to help you. 

The Power of the Davidson Alumni Network

When I speak with my friends and peers about post-grad plans, we all have different stories about how we found our first job. However, one thing we can all agree on is that landing that your first, straight-out-of-college career requires hard work, persistence and preparation. I’m writing this blog to tell you the not-so-elegant story of how I landed my first job out of college.

One day while perusing LinkedIn, convincing myself that I was working on my professional development, I accidentally tripped across my current employer. I kid you not, I wanted to see the power of the LinkedIn “Easy Apply” feature and, after a few clicks, was surprised by how easy it really was. In the matter of 30 seconds I had accidentally applied for a position I was dramatically under qualified for at a company called 2U. After a few moments of panic, I was able to withdraw my accidental submission. However, after looking into the company I had just accidentally applied for, I found that they were actually the company of my dreams, a technology company with the mission of making higher education more accessible.

A week later I scheduled a meeting with Jeanne-Marie Ryan, the Executive Director of the Center for Career Development, in order to strategize about my job search process. After expressing my interest in 2U, she gave me the contact information for Davidson Alum, Andy Thompson (’10), an employee of 2U. I connected with Andy within the next few days, had a great chat with him about his role at 2U and expressed my interest in joining the team. Presumably, Andy liked what he heard about my education and work background, because after we hung up he walked down the hall and recommended that HR review my application.

Fast forward a few weeks and many interviews later, and I have received and accepted an offer from 2U to work as a Marketing Associate in their office in the suburbs of Washington, DC. I could not be more excited about this opportunity, and sincerely believe I owe a large part of my success to the Davidson College alumni network.

In addition to 2U, Jeanne-Marie was able to connect me with Alumni at almost every company I applied to, whether it was a 30 person company or an almost 50,000 person company. Some panned out into offers and even for those that did not result in anything, I found the conversations to be extremely rewarding. The willingness of Davidson alumni to work on our behalf is encouraging. The support of the Davidson community extends far beyond this campus and I encourage all of my peers to think hard about tapping into the power of the Davidson alumni network in looking for jobs or making connections in new cities.

Cameron Causey ’17

Don’t Just Move Forward in Technology – Sprint Ahead

With technology careers in high demand, coding bootcamps have become an increasingly popular method for recent college grads to gain the additional skills needed to jump start a career in technology. Coding bootcamps are short, intense, training programs focused on teaching students the latest, in-demand technical skills. The average traditional coding bootcamp costs anywhere between $12,000 and $24,000. For many recent grads this cost is not a realistic option, given they may already be facing undergraduate student loans. Davidson College has partnered with a leading talent development company, Revature, to offer Davidson graduates a no-cost option that not only provides hands-on coding training, but also launches IT careers.

Revature is at the forefront of innovation and talent development. They provide training to recent college grads in enterprise-level, next-gen and niche technology through a world class 12-week immersive, industry aligned coding bootcamp. Revature’s talent development model is among the most inclusive and accessible in the nation. Graduates of the program become Revature professionals and work on innovative, challenging and rewarding software development projects for Revature corporate partners, including leading Fortune 500 companies, government organizations, and top systems integrator.

Camp includes:

  • A 12-week immersive, industry-aligned coding training program
  • Paid accommodations and a weekly living allowance during the training program
  • All books and training materials are provided at no cost
  • Professional certificates are paid for by Revature
  • Dedicated industry mentors to ensure your success during the training bootcamp and the first two years of employment
  • ePortfolio to showcase your projects, accomplishments, and certificates
  • Guaranteed employment for bootcamp graduates (positions located throughout the U.S.)

To be eligible for the bootcamp you must:

  1. Have graduated in the past two years with a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree (preferred majors include: Computer Science, Informatics, Engineering, Statistics, Economics, or Mathematics)
  2. Have some experience with C++. C#, Java or other select languages
  3. Be a U.S. Citizen

Don’t have the necessary programing experience? Don’t worry, if you aren’t ready for the intensive 12-week intensive bootcamp, Revature offers free online programs that support all levels of abilities from beginner to advanced.

Interested? Don’t wait as space is limited! Please visit http://www.revature.com/davidson for more information and to apply!

 

FAQS:

What makes Revature unique?

Most training bootcamps require you to invest in them. Revature is unique because Revature invests in you! Revature partners with many leading Fortune 500 companies, government organizations, and top systems integrators that are looking to for software professionals with experience in niche, next-gen, and leading-edge technologies. Revature hires entry-level coders, and then through immersive training delivers job-ready experienced software engineers. Graduates of the program go on to work on innovative and challenging projects for Revature’s corporate partners.

How do I apply?

Go to Revature.com/davidson

Can I contact a recruiter directly?

Yes! Call 888-789-1075 or email davidson@revature.com.

Can I join the coding bootcamp if I have no coding experience?

While anyone can apply, the coding bootcamp is very immersive and intensive. A background in coding is essential to successfully completing the program. If you have no coding experience, we suggest you enroll in our free online program first. Once you’ve completed a project with our online program, we’d love to have you apply for one of our coding bootcamps!

Where are bootcamps located?

There are remote bootcamps offered throughout the country with rolling bootcamps offered at Revature’s headquarters in Reston, VA.

 

By: Emily Hartman, Revature Marketing Director

Landing Your Summer Internship

Applying to summer opportunities is arguably one of the most stressful, taxing experiences of a college student’s career. What is the first step? Which city is best for me? Which city is best for the industry that I would like to enter? How do I make connections with people in the field? All of these questions, and the plethora of others, can quickly overwhelm and lead to stagnation. Connecting with alumnus/a before applying to a position can alleviate some of these stressors and avoid such stagnation. Here are steps to follow in order to speak with alumni who can offer career guidance and tips for the application process.

1 – Determine the city, or cities, that both appeal to you and are relevant to the industry that you would like to enter. For me, this meant either New York City or Boston—personally, because I am from the Northeast and miss it during the school year, and professionally, because these cities offer a multitude of marketing and sales opportunities.

2 – Research companies that share a culture similar to yours and that will fulfill your career goals. Glassdoor, Instagram, Twitter, and the company’s homepage, can illuminate the culture of the company and provide insight into employees work ethic and success. I desired a company with an intense work ethic yet a healthy balance of self-care. By scouring the Internet, I determined which companies in New York City and Boston aligned with these desires.

3 – Exploit DCAN and LinkedIn to determine alumni who work in or around your ideal cities. In the search bar on LinkedIn’s homepage, search the company. Then, filter the search by selecting “1st” and “2nd.” Scroll down to “Schools” and select “Davidson College,” or whichever school by which you would like to filter. Either message the alumnus/a through LinkedIn or use college resources to figure out his or her email address.

4 – Send a respectful, inquisitive message/email in which you ask if they would have any time to discuss their career and future steps that you could take to enter the industry. For example, below is the email that I drafted and sent:

Hi xxx,

 My name is Kate McNaughton and I am a xxx at Davidson College with an interest in the financial services industry. I came across your profile on LinkedIn and decided to reach out. I am eager to learn about your experiences and the steps you might recommend a Davidson student take to break into the industry. It’s always fascinating to learn how Davidson graduates are able to apply their liberal arts education to a more traditional, business-focused setting.

I recognize that you are extremely busy, thus I appreciate any time you may be able to offer for a phone conversation in the next few weeks. Undoubtedly, my schedule is more flexible than yours, so please let me know when works for you and I can finagle mine. Thank you!

 All my best,

Kate McNaughton

Davidson College ‘18

5 – Engage in either a phone or Skype conversation. Do not start the conversation by demanding information on internships offered by the company. Naturally progress into this part of the conversation. Typically, if the conversation were not going well, I could pick up on the cues. In these cases, neither the alumnus/a nor I would venture into internship territory.

6 – More than likely, even if the interview goes splendidly well, it will be necessary to apply through pre-set channels. Hopefully, though, the alumnus/a will recommend the recruiters to pay attention to your resume and application materials. In my experience, if I connected with an alumnus/a before applying to a position, chances drastically increased that I would make it to the first round.

Connecting with alumni is a smart way to alleviate stress and avoid unproductive stagnation. These individuals feel a bond with students at their alma mater, thus they would like to help in any possible way. But remember, alumni will likely only help if you are respectful and seem genuinely interested in their career path and industry.

 

Kate McNaughton ’18

Tresata Day: Success in the Workplace

“Constructive feedback is an investment in your career.” The Success in the Workplace professional development workshop emphasized this key point of feedback as an opportunity to grow from other people.

On February 23rd, I made an investment in myself and attended this final event of Tresata Day. The purpose of this workshop was to gain knowledge into the day-to-day skills of working on a job as opposed to the typical focus of just obtaining a job. It was a unique mix of presentation with consistent input from Tresata employees—and their CEO! This workshop was a great way to observe the true culture of a company and its employers, while also directly learning what employers like and dislike concerning employee and/or student interaction. As an intimidating reminder of the fact that I will be entering the “real” career field soon, I found the event especially beneficial for myself as a junior and thought it could definitely serve as a helpful reminder to graduating seniors as well. However, all of the information and tips provided were useful for any student entering any job or internship, whether it be your on-campus work study or an entry level position.

One key point that I took away from this event was knowing how to balance being an introvert in the workplace. It is very important to know who you are and how that may come across to other people, especially those who may not be introverts. This point ties in very heavily with obtaining feedback from others. People’s impressions of you matter. Being aware of who you are and how you operate/function personally and communicating and obtaining feedback from others will help you navigate the workplace much more efficiently.

Other key points from the workshop included:

  • Social media can be used as an extra advantage to you and your company if used properly.
  • If not used properly, social media can be detrimental to your career and possibly the company you work for.
  • Your body language, speech, appearance, and communication style ALL matter— Get feedback!! And always remember that when you are representing your company all of these things should reflect that.
  • One rule to live by when choosing appropriate work attire is if you have to ask if it’s appropriate then you already know the answer… (i.e. No!).
  • Constructive feedback is constructive – Google defines it as “serving a useful purpose” and that is exactly what it will do if you so allow.

Final tip from myself: Be sure to keep an eye out (and sign up) for other helpful and insightful events from the Center for Career Development on Handshake!

Mariah Clarke ’19

 

 

Davidson Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative

“I wish I had more real world experience while at Davidson.”

Over the past few years, I’ve met with dozens of Davidson College alumni to ask them about their Davidson experience, and despite their different academic and career interests, one common theme holds true: Everyone I’ve spoken to wishes they had been better able to complement their liberal arts education with more hands-on experiences focused on the “real world” while in school.

While chatting with a Class of 2007 grad the other day, I asked him about his biggest takeaway from his Davidson education. He gave me the classic liberal arts response: at Davidson, he learned how to communicate, gaining invaluable writing and speaking skills that have helped him every step of the way from graduation through today.

However, as quickly as he pointed out his appreciation for the English department, this grad told me how much he would have appreciated more opportunities to get outside of the classroom while at Davidson. Just ten years ago, he said, if you weren’t an Economics major interested in finance, you were pretty much on your own. Few mentorship and job exploration programs were available to students following other academic paths.

When I told him about Davidson’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative, his face lit up—that’s the type of program, he said, that had been missing from his education.

Davidson I&E, now enjoying its fourth year at Davidson, has quickly grown to become one of the most active and engaging extracurricular programs on campus, and with its many academic partnerships, I&E is becoming a central part of the Davidson experience.

Through summer internship programs with entrepreneurs and startups across the globe, and opportunities like 3 Day Startup and the Venture Lab, I&E offers a wide range of options for students, no matter their academic focus. Throughout the entire calendar year, I&E works hard to provide students with opportunities—to start a business, to intern at a startup, to pitch ideas to investors, and to gain mentorship from entrepreneurs and other professionals.

In my two years as part of the I&E Initiative, I have been able to do work that I had never imagined possible for a liberal arts-focused college student. Through I&E’s summer internship program, I was connected with VersaMe, an educational technology startup created by Jon and Chris Boggiano, Davidson’s own Entrepreneurs in Residence. At VersaMe, I became the tenth member of a quickly growing team, essentially created the young company’s marketing department, and worked directly with a great group of seasoned entrepreneurs, allowing me to get an idea for what it really takes to develop a successful business.

When asked how we value our education, the classic liberal arts response—“I learned how to think/write/communicate”—does mean something; in fact, I’d argue that it means a whole lot. The critical thinking skills we hone at Davidson are what allow us to be articulate, quick on our feet, and adaptable across situations, all traits which will serve us well regardless of where we end up postgrad. Sometimes, though, it can be difficult to see how these somewhat intangible skills measure up to the requirements for the type of work we want to do. And that’s where I&E comes in.

Davidson I&E extends the value of a liberal arts education by encouraging students to experiment with our liberal skillset before we are released into the “real world.” If you’re interested in edtech, grab a coffee with the Boggiano brothers. If you want to work on your idea for the next great app, apply for the Venture Lab. If you’d like to join a startup for the summer, try out I&E’s internship program. The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative will make this happen—all you have to do is come with energy and an open mind. (And Hannah, John-Michael, and the rest of the I&E team will be there to help you jumpstart the process!)

Allison Cowie ’18

 

The DOs and DON’Ts of Networking

We all hear about networking in today’s professional environment. We are told it is a necessary skill, not an optional one. What though is networking and how does one go about doing it successfully?

According to many experts, networking means: To build relations on the basis of trust that involves a give and take. Although seemingly simple, this definition is easier said than done. Let’s break it down….

To build relations: To build a relationship means that you are developing a pattern of interactions with another person. In order for this to be true, making a good first impression is crucial.

On the basis of trust: Trust suggests confidence in someone or something to be reliable, valid and truthful. Trust in a person also involves seeing strength in him/her.

Involves a give and take: Networking involves helping others and providing something or some service to others while also looking for something or some service from others.

So, how does one go about doing all of this? Below are my top 3 dos and don’ts for professionally networking with others.

Dos

  1. Make a good first impression. This includes:
    1. Being on-time to your meeting
    2. Over-dressing as opposed to under-dressing
    3. Being appreciative
    4. Listening attentively
  2. Develop a goal and strategy:
    1. Prepare ahead of time by researching the person and organization you are meeting with.
    2. Contemplate in advance what you hope to gain from this meeting in terms of information and additional potential contacts.
    3. Strategize what you can offer the person you are meeting with so that you ensure you are completing the ‘give and take’ component of networking.
  3. Follow-up:
    1. Always follow-up immediately after the meeting with a handwritten note or personal email.
    2. Reach out to your contacts quarterly, semi-annually or even annually with a card, phone call or email in order to ensure you maintain the relationship.

Don’ts

  1. Ask for a job:
    1. Asking for advice and asking someone to employ you are two very different things. It is always safe to ask others about their professional experiences and how they made the choices they did. It is rarely safe to ask others if they can hire you!
    2. Asking for a job threatens your image of strength and confidence, both of which are key components of trust.
  2. Stop networking because you have a job:
    1. Networking is most effective for growing on the job or changing jobs. When you are in crisis and trying to find a job, you are going to want a network to reach out to, so make sure to continue networking even when things are going well.
    2. Growing your network and maintaining your network via intermittent follow-ups to others takes time and purposeful energy. Make networking part of your professional duties so that you have relationships to call upon when you are in need of help.
  3. Underestimate the power of networking:
    1. Finding a job takes more than filling out an application on line, attending a job fair or even having an amazing resume.
    2. In an August 2009 survey competed by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., a global outplacement firm, human resources executives were asked to rate the effectiveness of various job-search methods on a scale of 1 (least effective) to 5 (most effective). Networking averaged a 3.98. And, about half of the executives gave networking the highest effectiveness rating of 5.

In the end, networking has now become an essential part of everyone’s professional lives. Focusing on the importance of a network; networking with awareness and purpose; and following the do’s and don’ts listed above can all have a positive impact on your professional path and help you find success, satisfaction and opportunities in your career. To learn more about networking, see Rebecca’s segment on the Charlotte Today Show.

 

Rebecca Glavin, Assistant Director for Career Development

Rebecca Glavin joins the Center for Career Development after having spent a number of years running her own practice, Glavin Counseling, as a clinician in Charlotte. She has an organizational psychology background and previously worked in leadership development consulting. Rebecca holds a BA in Psychology from Middlebury College, a Masters in Business Administration from UNC Charlotte, and a Masters in Social Work from Boston University. 

5 Questions to Help You Find a Job You Love

Sometimes I wish I could call someone and ask ‘what should I do with my life’? Wouldn’t it be great to have someone else tell you, if you do A, B, and C, you will feel happy, fulfilled and everything will work out? Wouldn’t it be great to have certainty related to your future, professionally and personally? Let’s be honest, I would be rich if I could be that person for others! What a gift that would be. Unfortunately, I have not figured how to precisely answer those questions for myself, much less for other people. I have, though, identified a few key questions that I think are worth asking yourself if you are interested in finding a career that feels less like a job and more like a passion.

  1. What does your ideal day look like? Your ideal week? In answering this question, think about whether or not you like to have your time structured or be more autonomous. Do you like to work alone or with people? Do you perform better if you leave your house? While you might not always get to choose your ideal day as part of your job, you can certainly seek out pieces of your ideal day in different roles that you consider.
  1. Before you retire, what do you want to be known for professionally and personally? What is your professional reputation right now? Do you want to change, expand or vary it? Sometimes thinking ahead and visualizing yourself at the end of your career can help to put your values, goals and objectives into perspective. Looking back on the bigger picture of your professional life can often refocus you on what is important to you and help you pass over things that aren’t.
  1. What do you most enjoy learning about? Thinking about? Talking about? Do you prefer to learn in a classroom environment or from a textbook? What topics do you love talking about? While not every person who loves race cars can, or should, work in the racing industry, reflecting on what it is about race cars that you love and trying to surround yourself with others who have similar passions can help to make you feel more engaged and excited about your own professional life.
  1. What emotion or sensation do you associate with success: Happiness? Excitement? Pride? Stress-free? Your answer to this question may determine what type of work you seek out and how often you hope to change your work. If you are someone who likes to be excited and constantly stimulated, you will likely benefit from a fast-paced, diverse job. If you consider your ideal job to be stress-free, then you will likely want a constant, low-intensity work environment. Departments and companies change, so while a job might have started as a good match for you, over time, it might become something else. It is important to continually check-in with yourself about how your work environment is affecting your emotions.
  1. What are you willing to give up? Continuing with the question above, if you are someone who seeks out fast-paced work environments, then you will likely give up a degree of control in your schedule and place of work. If you are someone who prefers to be in charge of your schedule and be an autonomous worker, then you will likely give up opportunities that exist in larger corporations because they are typically more bureaucratic. A person once told me: it is not comparing the pros that lead to a decision for someone, but rather comparing the cons. I thought that this was great advice, because in the end, whether you are an optimist or a pessimist, it is the cost of a decision to which a person pays the most attention to and remembers the longest.

Answers to these questions are not simple and often take time to work through. In truth, over the course of my career, my answers to these questions have changed. I do not think that they are stagnant or simple. Answers to these questions will not tell you what title or position you should seek out. However, they will help you to identify what role might be most likely to lead to a feeling of professional fulfillment. I recommend reviewing these questions on a yearly basis or when you feel a transition is coming. Reflecting on where you have been, where you are and where you hope to go in your professional path always behooves you and helps you to make informed decisions.

 

Rebecca Glavin, Assistant Director for Career Development

Rebecca Glavin joins the Center for Career Development after having spent a number of years running her own practice, Glavin Counseling, as a clinician in Charlotte. She has an organizational psychology background and previously worked in leadership development consulting. Rebecca holds a BA in Psychology from Middlebury College, a Masters in Business Administration from UNC Charlotte, and a Masters in Social Work from Boston University. 

New Year, New Look: Transforming the Center for Career Development

Following a semester filled with unprecedented success, we now focus our eyes on a new year—one promised to be abundant in enrichment and growth, and offer an outstanding array of career development opportunities for our students. As we shift our attention to a fresh semester, we aim to continuously drive strategic transformation via the strengthening of employer partnerships and career programming, office remodeling, and personnel hires that will amplify achievement.

Prior to the break, we reimagined our Center to intentionally optimize our space to include more rooms for consultation and interviews, so we have transformed individual offices to collaborative spaces to achieve this. When students return to campus, we will now have four rooms in the Center specifically designed for one-on-one advising and assessments, engaging with employers, and interview opportunities. As a key piece of our transformation, we are confident this new look will provide students with a warmer, more engaging atmosphere and allow for deeper connectivity and increased production. Students, be sure to stop by the Center upon your return—not just to see its facelift, but for career advising, of course!

Additionally, we are eager to welcome a fresh face to our staff: Rebecca Glavin, Assistant Director for Career Development. Rebecca is a key hire to heighten the Center’s success, and she will focus on the Davidson Impact Fellows Program, the Center’s Annual report as well as student advising and assessment. She joins us with distinguished experience in career coaching. She is well-versed in building strong client relationships, having owned her own counseling firm, Glavin Counseling, as a North Carolina Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Her passion for people and counseling will undoubtedly add to our dynamic staff.

I am also thrilled to have joined the Center for Career Development in the Fall as an Assistant Director to deliver high-quality relationship management and support to our clients – both students and employers, alumni, graduate schools and other external and internal stakeholders. With marketing and communications skills honed in both the private sector at Unlimited Success Sports Management, and prior to this, within higher ed environments at Mississippi State University, I am excited to bring my enthusiasm to the Center. Since arriving in the Fall, I’ve hit the ground running, enjoying the opportunity to serve Davidson students through various signature career development events and one-on-one advising. I look forward to getting to know each one of you as a new semester begins!

As you can see, we have been quite busy ensuring intentional steps are taken to fully leverage the Center to deliver career opportunities to all Davidson students. Through the support and partnership of key employers, parents, faculty, staff and alumni, we have been able to capitalize on strategic change to generate successful engagement outcomes with our students and enhance professional development initiatives. We look forward to welcoming each of you back in the new year and cannot wait to help you achieve your post-Davidson goals.

Stay tuned for more… we are just getting started!

 

Sarah Layne,
Assistant Director for Career Development

Maximizing Your Career Potential During Winter Break

So you’ve made it through fall semester successfully! As you look ahead to a month of rest, reconnection, and reflection time, you may be wondering what to do with all of this free time?   This is a perfect opportunity to focus in on your career exploration and development to ensure ongoing success! Here are three tips to help you make the most of your career potential during winter break:

 Polish Your Resume

Whether this is your first semester at Davidson – or you’ve been here awhile – it’s important to create a collegiate resume and keep it updated! Not only does it mitigate stress later when you are applying to on campus positions, internships, or research initiatives, but it’s also a best practice for post-Davidson to keep that resume up to date and polished.  Not sure where to begin? Check out the Center for Career Development resume guide page for tips and advice on keeping your documents fresh. We even have editable templates to make it easy to get started today!

 Have a Career Conversation

Winter break is a great time to explore the world of work and what the myriad of possibilities are! Curious about a certain industry or job? The Davidson Career Advisor Network (DCAN) is a great way to connect with alumni and key stakeholders who are interested in supporting your career exploration and development through one-on-one coaching. You can search through advisors, send a request, and connect via conference call – all through the platform! These session topics can include resume reviews, mock interviews, or career conversations, which are designed to demystify specific professional paths of interest. Be sure to curate a short list of questions you want to ask before the conversation, to showcase your preparedness and interest in learning more. We’ve compiled a sample set of questions you might consider as you get started here.

Launch Your Internship Search

For many students, winter break is an ideal time to jumpstart (or continue) a strategic internship search. This doesn’t mean you will start and complete that search before classes start again in January, but it is a great time to peruse Handshake for opportunities and upcoming networking & on campus recruiting sessions.   The system gets updated regularly, so why not take stock now and start applying to opportunities of interest? Once you do this, you can continue the habit when you return to campus – designating time for yourself each week to work on your search. Have questions? Pop over to Appointlet to schedule a career advising session with a career coach in the Center in January!

 

About Tiffany Waddell
Tiffany Waddell, Assistant Director for Career Development

Passionate about helping others develop themselves professionally and identify how their unique skills and interests can not only be cultivated, but add value to professional relationships, organizations, and the world, Tiffany has effectively coached hundreds of budding young professionals on how to create and launch strategic action plans to accomplish long and short-term goals.  She received her BA & MA from Wake Forest University.