Exploring Your Interests: The Value of Events On and Off Campus

Have you ever wondered what career field is right for you? All of us at some point have considered our interests and how they may align with certain internships, jobs or positions in the future.  Oftentimes, the best way to identify where our interests may or may not lie is through experience.  Opportunities to get involved outside of the classroom can be our windows into different types of real world experiences.  These opportunities don’t always have to take form in a summer long internship.  Events found on Handshake like career treks and local competitions can be valuable learning experiences.

The Charlotte HACKathon hosted by Tresata was an overnight competition that sought to solve a problem presented by Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Greater Charlotte. Contestants were given a large dataset and tasked with identifying strategies or insights into how to improve matches between volunteer mentors and local students.

The competition gave contestants an opportunity to work as a group to help a local non-profit in a meaningful way as well as gain exposure into the world of Big Data analytics.  Overall, the event gave good insight into the skills and techniques used in a real-world application and allowed participants to put their own skills to the test.

These types of experiences are priceless when deciding what career field you may be interested in.  You learn what skills you want to obtain and what tasks you enjoy, as well as learning techniques for solving problems on the fly.

While you’re searching for a potential career field that might interest you, I urge you to consider events on campus or in the area that could help guide you in the future.  Investing your time in an event one afternoon can open the doors for future opportunities.   As a Davidson student, your time is valuable. Participating in and/or attending events like career treks, or the upcoming DataFest on campus, can be a quick and easy way to test your interests before taking on a summer internship in a field that you are unsure about.  Then, once an opportunity that aligns with your interests opens up, you can confidently pursue whatever comes your way.

Chris Cardwell ’18

Landing Your Summer Internship

Applying to summer opportunities is arguably one of the most stressful, taxing experiences of a college student’s career. What is the first step? Which city is best for me? Which city is best for the industry that I would like to enter? How do I make connections with people in the field? All of these questions, and the plethora of others, can quickly overwhelm and lead to stagnation. Connecting with alumnus/a before applying to a position can alleviate some of these stressors and avoid such stagnation. Here are steps to follow in order to speak with alumni who can offer career guidance and tips for the application process.

1 – Determine the city, or cities, that both appeal to you and are relevant to the industry that you would like to enter. For me, this meant either New York City or Boston—personally, because I am from the Northeast and miss it during the school year, and professionally, because these cities offer a multitude of marketing and sales opportunities.

2 – Research companies that share a culture similar to yours and that will fulfill your career goals. Glassdoor, Instagram, Twitter, and the company’s homepage, can illuminate the culture of the company and provide insight into employees work ethic and success. I desired a company with an intense work ethic yet a healthy balance of self-care. By scouring the Internet, I determined which companies in New York City and Boston aligned with these desires.

3 – Exploit DCAN and LinkedIn to determine alumni who work in or around your ideal cities. In the search bar on LinkedIn’s homepage, search the company. Then, filter the search by selecting “1st” and “2nd.” Scroll down to “Schools” and select “Davidson College,” or whichever school by which you would like to filter. Either message the alumnus/a through LinkedIn or use college resources to figure out his or her email address.

4 – Send a respectful, inquisitive message/email in which you ask if they would have any time to discuss their career and future steps that you could take to enter the industry. For example, below is the email that I drafted and sent:

Hi xxx,

 My name is Kate McNaughton and I am a xxx at Davidson College with an interest in the financial services industry. I came across your profile on LinkedIn and decided to reach out. I am eager to learn about your experiences and the steps you might recommend a Davidson student take to break into the industry. It’s always fascinating to learn how Davidson graduates are able to apply their liberal arts education to a more traditional, business-focused setting.

I recognize that you are extremely busy, thus I appreciate any time you may be able to offer for a phone conversation in the next few weeks. Undoubtedly, my schedule is more flexible than yours, so please let me know when works for you and I can finagle mine. Thank you!

 All my best,

Kate McNaughton

Davidson College ‘18

5 – Engage in either a phone or Skype conversation. Do not start the conversation by demanding information on internships offered by the company. Naturally progress into this part of the conversation. Typically, if the conversation were not going well, I could pick up on the cues. In these cases, neither the alumnus/a nor I would venture into internship territory.

6 – More than likely, even if the interview goes splendidly well, it will be necessary to apply through pre-set channels. Hopefully, though, the alumnus/a will recommend the recruiters to pay attention to your resume and application materials. In my experience, if I connected with an alumnus/a before applying to a position, chances drastically increased that I would make it to the first round.

Connecting with alumni is a smart way to alleviate stress and avoid unproductive stagnation. These individuals feel a bond with students at their alma mater, thus they would like to help in any possible way. But remember, alumni will likely only help if you are respectful and seem genuinely interested in their career path and industry.

 

Kate McNaughton ’18

Job Shadowing Externship Program

The opportunity to apply for the annual Job Shadowing Externship Program is upon us. I’ll lay out the pertinent information and dates so that you are best prepared to apply and succeed within the program.

What is it?

The Davidson Job Shadowing Externship Program provides one-day and multi-day shadowing opportunities for students to shadow professionals (many of whom are alumni and parents) in an industry of interest. Last year’s program had students shadowing in Communications, Media, Marketing, Education, Banking, Finance, Healthcare, Consulting, Public Policy, Law, and various other sectors. No matter what your major is at Davidson, there is an opportunity available within in the program for you.

Shadowing experiences are available across the United States and around the globe. Wherever you are headed this summer, you can find an opportunity near you. If students must travel and stay multiple nights, there are even homestay and funding opportunities available.

Information sessions will be hosted to provide more details about the program. As will be mentioned later, all interested applicants must attend at least one of the Job Shadowing Information Sessions on:

March 2 at 11:05 am in Room 313 of the Union

March 13 at 4:30 pm in Room 209 of the Union

March 14 at 11:05 am in Room 408 of the Union

The Experience

Last year 141 students participated in 195 unique shadowing experiences. 57% of the participants were underclassmen while 43% were upperclassmen. For younger students, it is a great opportunity to get your head in the door in an industry, and to see if that career path is the one for you. An interesting and stimulating experience in the workplace may guide the rest of your time at Davidson. For older students, the program is a very real day in the life experience of what work in a chosen field will be after graduation. Regardless of year, the program offers invaluable networking experiences and insights into potential careers.

Previous students have thoroughly enjoyed the program; 98% of last year’s participants would recommend job shadowing to a friend. A student, who graduated last year and reflected on her job shadowing experience via blog, left this advice to perspective students:

“So I end with an urgent message to Davidson underclassmen: please, if you do anything during your career search, USE THIS PROGRAM. You will learn so much. You will meet people willing to help you in your journey. And you will finally have a few answers in your pocket when someone asks that dreadful question “so what are you going to do with that major?” Oh, let me tell you.”” 

If you would like to read this student’s full experience, it can be found here.

The Application

In order to apply for the program, students must attend one of the aforementioned information sessions. Attendance at one of these sessions will allow students to access the application via Handshake. Here are the important dates:

March 2, 13, 14: Students must attend an information session in the Student Union.

March 6: Students with Handshake access may begin to fill out and submit the application.

March 19: The deadline for all job shadowing applications.

March 29: Hosts and Students are notified of their job shadowing match.

If you have any questions about the experience or application be sure to ask them in the information session, or stop by the Center for Career Development for a walk-in Monday-Friday from 8:30am-5:00pm.

Learn more: www.davidson.edu/job-shadowing

Pat Morris ’18 is a Political Science major at Davidson.

Tresata Day: Success in the Workplace

“Constructive feedback is an investment in your career.” The Success in the Workplace professional development workshop emphasized this key point of feedback as an opportunity to grow from other people.

On February 23rd, I made an investment in myself and attended this final event of Tresata Day. The purpose of this workshop was to gain knowledge into the day-to-day skills of working on a job as opposed to the typical focus of just obtaining a job. It was a unique mix of presentation with consistent input from Tresata employees—and their CEO! This workshop was a great way to observe the true culture of a company and its employers, while also directly learning what employers like and dislike concerning employee and/or student interaction. As an intimidating reminder of the fact that I will be entering the “real” career field soon, I found the event especially beneficial for myself as a junior and thought it could definitely serve as a helpful reminder to graduating seniors as well. However, all of the information and tips provided were useful for any student entering any job or internship, whether it be your on-campus work study or an entry level position.

One key point that I took away from this event was knowing how to balance being an introvert in the workplace. It is very important to know who you are and how that may come across to other people, especially those who may not be introverts. This point ties in very heavily with obtaining feedback from others. People’s impressions of you matter. Being aware of who you are and how you operate/function personally and communicating and obtaining feedback from others will help you navigate the workplace much more efficiently.

Other key points from the workshop included:

  • Social media can be used as an extra advantage to you and your company if used properly.
  • If not used properly, social media can be detrimental to your career and possibly the company you work for.
  • Your body language, speech, appearance, and communication style ALL matter— Get feedback!! And always remember that when you are representing your company all of these things should reflect that.
  • One rule to live by when choosing appropriate work attire is if you have to ask if it’s appropriate then you already know the answer… (i.e. No!).
  • Constructive feedback is constructive – Google defines it as “serving a useful purpose” and that is exactly what it will do if you so allow.

Final tip from myself: Be sure to keep an eye out (and sign up) for other helpful and insightful events from the Center for Career Development on Handshake!

Mariah Clarke ’19

 

 

Davidson Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative

“I wish I had more real world experience while at Davidson.”

Over the past few years, I’ve met with dozens of Davidson College alumni to ask them about their Davidson experience, and despite their different academic and career interests, one common theme holds true: Everyone I’ve spoken to wishes they had been better able to complement their liberal arts education with more hands-on experiences focused on the “real world” while in school.

While chatting with a Class of 2007 grad the other day, I asked him about his biggest takeaway from his Davidson education. He gave me the classic liberal arts response: at Davidson, he learned how to communicate, gaining invaluable writing and speaking skills that have helped him every step of the way from graduation through today.

However, as quickly as he pointed out his appreciation for the English department, this grad told me how much he would have appreciated more opportunities to get outside of the classroom while at Davidson. Just ten years ago, he said, if you weren’t an Economics major interested in finance, you were pretty much on your own. Few mentorship and job exploration programs were available to students following other academic paths.

When I told him about Davidson’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative, his face lit up—that’s the type of program, he said, that had been missing from his education.

Davidson I&E, now enjoying its fourth year at Davidson, has quickly grown to become one of the most active and engaging extracurricular programs on campus, and with its many academic partnerships, I&E is becoming a central part of the Davidson experience.

Through summer internship programs with entrepreneurs and startups across the globe, and opportunities like 3 Day Startup and the Venture Lab, I&E offers a wide range of options for students, no matter their academic focus. Throughout the entire calendar year, I&E works hard to provide students with opportunities—to start a business, to intern at a startup, to pitch ideas to investors, and to gain mentorship from entrepreneurs and other professionals.

In my two years as part of the I&E Initiative, I have been able to do work that I had never imagined possible for a liberal arts-focused college student. Through I&E’s summer internship program, I was connected with VersaMe, an educational technology startup created by Jon and Chris Boggiano, Davidson’s own Entrepreneurs in Residence. At VersaMe, I became the tenth member of a quickly growing team, essentially created the young company’s marketing department, and worked directly with a great group of seasoned entrepreneurs, allowing me to get an idea for what it really takes to develop a successful business.

When asked how we value our education, the classic liberal arts response—“I learned how to think/write/communicate”—does mean something; in fact, I’d argue that it means a whole lot. The critical thinking skills we hone at Davidson are what allow us to be articulate, quick on our feet, and adaptable across situations, all traits which will serve us well regardless of where we end up postgrad. Sometimes, though, it can be difficult to see how these somewhat intangible skills measure up to the requirements for the type of work we want to do. And that’s where I&E comes in.

Davidson I&E extends the value of a liberal arts education by encouraging students to experiment with our liberal skillset before we are released into the “real world.” If you’re interested in edtech, grab a coffee with the Boggiano brothers. If you want to work on your idea for the next great app, apply for the Venture Lab. If you’d like to join a startup for the summer, try out I&E’s internship program. The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative will make this happen—all you have to do is come with energy and an open mind. (And Hannah, John-Michael, and the rest of the I&E team will be there to help you jumpstart the process!)

Allison Cowie ’18

 

Up Close with Harman: Finance + Liberal Arts

This past summer I had a 9-week internship at Harman International in their finance department as a “Financial Planning and Analysis Intern.” Despite Harman’s significant size, many people are unaware of the scope of the company’s business. Harman is a large corporation (about $7 billion of revenue) based in Stamford, CT, and is best known for being an audio company that owns JBL, AKG, and Harman Kardon.  However, their main source of revenue and focus is in car audio and infotainment systems. The company is divided into four segments: infotainment systems for cars, consumer audio, professional audio, and something they call connected services, which does outsourced research and development (primarily writing software for telecom and auto companies). What makes Harman so interesting to me is that it joins hardware and software almost seamlessly and covers a wide array of products and services that makes for a constantly evolving company where there are always more to learn. While the company was just acquired by Samsung, they still function autonomously. The internship offered opportunity, flexibility, and value far more than I imagined.

At its most basic level, the internship offered the opportunity for me to refine my analytical and quantitative skills, as I performed market share and financial analysis, developed financial projections, valuations and risk assessments for the CFO.  Coming from Davidson and having an interest in a career in finance, developing my analytical skill set was important to me. However, the knowledge and skills I acquired during this internship went far beyond just what I gained from preforming the tasks I was assigned. I developed relationships with many of the incredibly smart people that surrounded me, even if they weren’t in my division. My manager was able to introduce me to people in areas where I expressed interest.  After getting acclimated to the environment, I started to do this on my own, and even got involved with projects in areas I wanted exposure. For example, I was curious to explore the concept and methods of valuation, so I reached out to the M&A group where I got involved in a valuation project – something that proved extremely interesting to me.  This internship gave me greater confidence to take this kind of initiative, a life skill that I know will be incredibly valuable to me as I pursue my future career.

Finally, this internship gave me the opportunity to use my knowledge (mostly analytical problem solving strategies gained as a liberal arts student at Davidson!), creativity, and newly acquired financial skills to engage in an entrepreneurial business project and interact with professionals at all levels of the company. The interns were divided into groups to create and execute a business plan to promote and sell Harman headphones to companies and then present this strategy and results to CEO. The “Campus to Corporate” project was an all-encompassing “challenge” in many ways.  It further developed and expanded many aspects of my business skill set, challenging my ability to strategize, collaborate, be creative, and execute, while also honing my presentation skills.  Working with my teammates in a constantly changing and dynamic setting forced us to be nimble with our strategy execution and think outside of the box while staying focused on the end result.  On top of everything else, the opportunity to present to the CEO and other executives was extraordinary!

Apply to Harman’s College to Corporate internship on Handshake

Annie Walker is in her junior year at Davidson College, majoring in political science with a minor in economics. Annie is interning this summer at Wells Fargo’s Investment bank in their NYC Technology Media and Telecom group. 

Up Close with Tresata: Big Data

As a senior, Math major and Computer Science minor from Shanghai, China, my career interest is Big Data and data analytics, and I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to intern at Tresata this past summer.

Because I am interested in using data analytics to unveil the hidden layers of pattern in data, Tresata was a great fit for me as a big data software intelligence company. Tresata believes that “data” is the theme of the next “industrial revolution” and aims to use data analytics to automate complex business problems.

The summer was rewarding because I was in a great position working with passion, but also challenging because this was my first professional experience in the field of data analytics. There was a lot to learn and quickly adjust to, such as the internal technologies and new programming languages. Moreover, after one and a half weeks of training, we (the interns) were then each given a project and related data; it was not easy for us rookies to approach those problems and massive datasets at first – my dataset was over 90G!

Fortunately, we had more than enough resources to help us succeed: everyone else at Tresata. We spent countless hours through discussion, mentoring, giving feedback and helping each other; it was truly a great working environment because everyone was a mentor and a friend at the same time. We enjoyed intellectual conversations on technical insights as well as discussions about one another’s personal life. Every month, the company sponsored a mandatory “Fun Event”: we went to attend a Knights baseball game in June and went bowling in July. Time flew by as we went from the clueless interns to seemingly experienced professionals, standing in front of everyone to present our projects in the last week.

Tresata has helped me get my first hands-on experience in the field of data analytics and also strengthened my pursuit of Big Data. Love your work and love who you work with!

Tresata currently has 3 internships posted. Visit Handshake to learn more and apply!

Tresata will also be on campus February 23 for a full day of events. Visit Handshake to RSVP.

Xudong “Brandon” Liang is a senior, Math major and Computer Science from Shanghai, China. He will join Tresata in the beginning of February in 2017.

The DOs and DON’Ts of Networking

We all hear about networking in today’s professional environment. We are told it is a necessary skill, not an optional one. What though is networking and how does one go about doing it successfully?

According to many experts, networking means: To build relations on the basis of trust that involves a give and take. Although seemingly simple, this definition is easier said than done. Let’s break it down….

To build relations: To build a relationship means that you are developing a pattern of interactions with another person. In order for this to be true, making a good first impression is crucial.

On the basis of trust: Trust suggests confidence in someone or something to be reliable, valid and truthful. Trust in a person also involves seeing strength in him/her.

Involves a give and take: Networking involves helping others and providing something or some service to others while also looking for something or some service from others.

So, how does one go about doing all of this? Below are my top 3 dos and don’ts for professionally networking with others.

Dos

  1. Make a good first impression. This includes:
    1. Being on-time to your meeting
    2. Over-dressing as opposed to under-dressing
    3. Being appreciative
    4. Listening attentively
  2. Develop a goal and strategy:
    1. Prepare ahead of time by researching the person and organization you are meeting with.
    2. Contemplate in advance what you hope to gain from this meeting in terms of information and additional potential contacts.
    3. Strategize what you can offer the person you are meeting with so that you ensure you are completing the ‘give and take’ component of networking.
  3. Follow-up:
    1. Always follow-up immediately after the meeting with a handwritten note or personal email.
    2. Reach out to your contacts quarterly, semi-annually or even annually with a card, phone call or email in order to ensure you maintain the relationship.

Don’ts

  1. Ask for a job:
    1. Asking for advice and asking someone to employ you are two very different things. It is always safe to ask others about their professional experiences and how they made the choices they did. It is rarely safe to ask others if they can hire you!
    2. Asking for a job threatens your image of strength and confidence, both of which are key components of trust.
  2. Stop networking because you have a job:
    1. Networking is most effective for growing on the job or changing jobs. When you are in crisis and trying to find a job, you are going to want a network to reach out to, so make sure to continue networking even when things are going well.
    2. Growing your network and maintaining your network via intermittent follow-ups to others takes time and purposeful energy. Make networking part of your professional duties so that you have relationships to call upon when you are in need of help.
  3. Underestimate the power of networking:
    1. Finding a job takes more than filling out an application on line, attending a job fair or even having an amazing resume.
    2. In an August 2009 survey competed by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., a global outplacement firm, human resources executives were asked to rate the effectiveness of various job-search methods on a scale of 1 (least effective) to 5 (most effective). Networking averaged a 3.98. And, about half of the executives gave networking the highest effectiveness rating of 5.

In the end, networking has now become an essential part of everyone’s professional lives. Focusing on the importance of a network; networking with awareness and purpose; and following the do’s and don’ts listed above can all have a positive impact on your professional path and help you find success, satisfaction and opportunities in your career. To learn more about networking, see Rebecca’s segment on the Charlotte Today Show.

 

Rebecca Glavin, Assistant Director for Career Development

Rebecca Glavin joins the Center for Career Development after having spent a number of years running her own practice, Glavin Counseling, as a clinician in Charlotte. She has an organizational psychology background and previously worked in leadership development consulting. Rebecca holds a BA in Psychology from Middlebury College, a Masters in Business Administration from UNC Charlotte, and a Masters in Social Work from Boston University. 

5 Questions to Help You Find a Job You Love

Sometimes I wish I could call someone and ask ‘what should I do with my life’? Wouldn’t it be great to have someone else tell you, if you do A, B, and C, you will feel happy, fulfilled and everything will work out? Wouldn’t it be great to have certainty related to your future, professionally and personally? Let’s be honest, I would be rich if I could be that person for others! What a gift that would be. Unfortunately, I have not figured how to precisely answer those questions for myself, much less for other people. I have, though, identified a few key questions that I think are worth asking yourself if you are interested in finding a career that feels less like a job and more like a passion.

  1. What does your ideal day look like? Your ideal week? In answering this question, think about whether or not you like to have your time structured or be more autonomous. Do you like to work alone or with people? Do you perform better if you leave your house? While you might not always get to choose your ideal day as part of your job, you can certainly seek out pieces of your ideal day in different roles that you consider.
  1. Before you retire, what do you want to be known for professionally and personally? What is your professional reputation right now? Do you want to change, expand or vary it? Sometimes thinking ahead and visualizing yourself at the end of your career can help to put your values, goals and objectives into perspective. Looking back on the bigger picture of your professional life can often refocus you on what is important to you and help you pass over things that aren’t.
  1. What do you most enjoy learning about? Thinking about? Talking about? Do you prefer to learn in a classroom environment or from a textbook? What topics do you love talking about? While not every person who loves race cars can, or should, work in the racing industry, reflecting on what it is about race cars that you love and trying to surround yourself with others who have similar passions can help to make you feel more engaged and excited about your own professional life.
  1. What emotion or sensation do you associate with success: Happiness? Excitement? Pride? Stress-free? Your answer to this question may determine what type of work you seek out and how often you hope to change your work. If you are someone who likes to be excited and constantly stimulated, you will likely benefit from a fast-paced, diverse job. If you consider your ideal job to be stress-free, then you will likely want a constant, low-intensity work environment. Departments and companies change, so while a job might have started as a good match for you, over time, it might become something else. It is important to continually check-in with yourself about how your work environment is affecting your emotions.
  1. What are you willing to give up? Continuing with the question above, if you are someone who seeks out fast-paced work environments, then you will likely give up a degree of control in your schedule and place of work. If you are someone who prefers to be in charge of your schedule and be an autonomous worker, then you will likely give up opportunities that exist in larger corporations because they are typically more bureaucratic. A person once told me: it is not comparing the pros that lead to a decision for someone, but rather comparing the cons. I thought that this was great advice, because in the end, whether you are an optimist or a pessimist, it is the cost of a decision to which a person pays the most attention to and remembers the longest.

Answers to these questions are not simple and often take time to work through. In truth, over the course of my career, my answers to these questions have changed. I do not think that they are stagnant or simple. Answers to these questions will not tell you what title or position you should seek out. However, they will help you to identify what role might be most likely to lead to a feeling of professional fulfillment. I recommend reviewing these questions on a yearly basis or when you feel a transition is coming. Reflecting on where you have been, where you are and where you hope to go in your professional path always behooves you and helps you to make informed decisions.

 

Rebecca Glavin, Assistant Director for Career Development

Rebecca Glavin joins the Center for Career Development after having spent a number of years running her own practice, Glavin Counseling, as a clinician in Charlotte. She has an organizational psychology background and previously worked in leadership development consulting. Rebecca holds a BA in Psychology from Middlebury College, a Masters in Business Administration from UNC Charlotte, and a Masters in Social Work from Boston University. 

New Year, New Look: Transforming the Center for Career Development

Following a semester filled with unprecedented success, we now focus our eyes on a new year—one promised to be abundant in enrichment and growth, and offer an outstanding array of career development opportunities for our students. As we shift our attention to a fresh semester, we aim to continuously drive strategic transformation via the strengthening of employer partnerships and career programming, office remodeling, and personnel hires that will amplify achievement.

Prior to the break, we reimagined our Center to intentionally optimize our space to include more rooms for consultation and interviews, so we have transformed individual offices to collaborative spaces to achieve this. When students return to campus, we will now have four rooms in the Center specifically designed for one-on-one advising and assessments, engaging with employers, and interview opportunities. As a key piece of our transformation, we are confident this new look will provide students with a warmer, more engaging atmosphere and allow for deeper connectivity and increased production. Students, be sure to stop by the Center upon your return—not just to see its facelift, but for career advising, of course!

Additionally, we are eager to welcome a fresh face to our staff: Rebecca Glavin, Assistant Director for Career Development. Rebecca is a key hire to heighten the Center’s success, and she will focus on the Davidson Impact Fellows Program, the Center’s Annual report as well as student advising and assessment. She joins us with distinguished experience in career coaching. She is well-versed in building strong client relationships, having owned her own counseling firm, Glavin Counseling, as a North Carolina Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Her passion for people and counseling will undoubtedly add to our dynamic staff.

I am also thrilled to have joined the Center for Career Development in the Fall as an Assistant Director to deliver high-quality relationship management and support to our clients – both students and employers, alumni, graduate schools and other external and internal stakeholders. With marketing and communications skills honed in both the private sector at Unlimited Success Sports Management, and prior to this, within higher ed environments at Mississippi State University, I am excited to bring my enthusiasm to the Center. Since arriving in the Fall, I’ve hit the ground running, enjoying the opportunity to serve Davidson students through various signature career development events and one-on-one advising. I look forward to getting to know each one of you as a new semester begins!

As you can see, we have been quite busy ensuring intentional steps are taken to fully leverage the Center to deliver career opportunities to all Davidson students. Through the support and partnership of key employers, parents, faculty, staff and alumni, we have been able to capitalize on strategic change to generate successful engagement outcomes with our students and enhance professional development initiatives. We look forward to welcoming each of you back in the new year and cannot wait to help you achieve your post-Davidson goals.

Stay tuned for more… we are just getting started!

 

Sarah Layne,
Assistant Director for Career Development